5th Edition PMBOK® Guide: Chapter 8: Process 8.2 Perform Quality Assurance


This post gives an overview of the second of the three processes in the Quality Management Knowledge Area, namely process 8.2 Perform Quality Assurance, by listing the inputs, tools & techniques of the process, and the outputs.   Perform Quality Assurance belongs to the Executing Process Group, and focuses on the processes, while Perform Quality Control (in the Monitoring & Controlling Process Group) looks at the product or deliverable itself.

1.  Inputs

The first three of the inputs listed for this process are outputs of the planning process 8.1 Plan Quality.  The fourth input comes from the monitoring & controlling process 8.3 Perform Quality Control.

 

8.2 PERFORM QUALITY ASSURANCE
INPUTS
1. Quality Management Plan Describes the quality assurance approaches for the project.  This is an output of process 8.1 Plan Quality.
2. Process Improvement Plan Describes the continuous process improvement approaches for the project.  This is an output of process 8.1 Plan Quality.
3. Quality Metrics Provides the attributes to be measured and the allowable variations.  This is an output of process 8.1 Plan Quality.
4. Quality control measurements The output of activities from process 8.3 Perform Quality Control.  These measurements are used in this process to analyze the quality of the processes.
5. Project documents Should be monitored in this process in the context of configuration management (so all project team members work from the same version of the project documents).
TOOLS & TECHNIQUES
1. Quality management and control tools The same tools & techniques used in process 8.1 Plan Quality and 8.3 Perform Quality Control are used in addition to the following seven tools:

  • Affinity diagrams
  • Process decision program charts (PDPC)
  • Interrelationship digraphs
  • Tree diagrams
  • Prioritization matrices
  • Activity network diagrams
  • Matrix diagrams
2. Quality audits An organized process that asks the question:  do the project activities conform to the organization’s quality policies, processes, and procedures.  All good practices that conform are identified and put in the lessons learned; those practices that don’t conform are corrected.
3. Process analysis Identifies needed improvements in processes and preventive actions needed through root-cause analysis.
OUTPUTS
1. Change requests All requests for changes that result from an audit are then input into process 4.5 Perform Integrated Change Control under Integration Management.
2. Project management plan updates The following component plans are updated:

  • Quality management plan
  • Scope management plan
  • Schedule management plan
  • Cost management plan
3. Project documents updates
  • Quality audit reports
  • Training plans
  • Process documentation
4. OPAs updates
  • Organization’s quality standards
  • Quality management system (guidelines, policies, procedures)

2.  Tools & Techniques

The seven quality control tools listed are used in addition to those quality tools already listed for the other two processes in Quality Management, 8.1 Plan Quality and 8.3 Perform Quality Control.

I have reviewed all of these techniques in the context of my blog posts on Six Sigma, but for the next few blog posts, I will repurpose these blog posts, because the tools are very useful for Quality Assurance.

3.  Outputs

Since the main question asked by quality audits is whether the project activities conform to the organization’s quality policies, processes, and procedures, if the answer to the question is “no” for some of those activities, they will need to be changed to bring them into conformance.  Those change requests are the first output of this process, which then get fed into the process 4.5 Perform Integrated Change Control.

The quality management plan may be updated as a result of these audits, and the results of the quality audits will be conveyed to the project team and the relevant stakeholders as another output of the process.

The next post will cover the Cost of Quality, because this is important in now only educating stakeholders in why quality activities are being undertaken, but in setting the level of quality for a project.

The next post will cover the seven quality control tools used as part of this process.

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