The Upcoming 5th Edition of the PMBOK Guide—The New Knowledge Area


In the last post I summarized some of the new features in the 5th Edition of the PMBOK guide. In the next series of posts, I will examine each of these features to see what they tell us about current trends within PMI regarding project management.

This post looks at the fact that, whereas there are no process groups in the 5th edition, there is one new knowledge area called Stakeholder Management for a total now of 10 knowledge areas (the others are Integration, Scope, Time, Cost, Quality, Human Resources, Communications, Risk, and Procurements).

Stakeholder management used to be part of the Communications knowledge area. However, PMI recognizes that an increasing number of studies show that it is important to not only inform stakeholders, but to engage them in the decision-making process where appropriate in order to have a successful project.   This new knowledge area focuses on the importance of doing just that.

1. Stakeholder Management—From 4th Edition to 5th Edition

Here are the processes in the Communications Management knowledge area in the 4th edition.

Figure 1. Communications Management processes in the 4th Edition PMBOK® Guide.

Process

Group

Process

Number

Process
Name
Process Description
Initiating 10.1 Identify Stakeholders Identifying project stakeholders, that is, people impacted by the project, and documenting their interests, involvement, and impact on the project.
Planning 10.2 Plan Communications Determining the needs of project stakeholders for information and defining a communication approach.
Executing 10.3 Distribute Information Making relevant information available to project stakeholders.
10.4 Manage Stakeholder Expectations Communicating with project stakeholders to meet their needs and address issues as they occur.
Monitoring & Controlling 10.5 Report Performance Collecting and distributing performance information (status reports, progress measurements, forecasts) to project stakeholders.

I have highlighted those two processes, process 10.1 Identify Stakeholders and 10.4 Manage Stakeholder Expectations, which are being transferred in the 5th edition to the new Stakeholder Management knowledge area. In addition to these two processes, there will be two new processes in the Planning process group and the Monitoring & Controlling process group, called Plan Stakeholder Management and Control Stakeholders Engagement. Here’s a chart containing the new Stakeholder Management knowledge area processes.

Figure 2. Stakeholder Management processes in the 5th PMBOK® Guide

Process

Group

Process

Number

Process
Name
Process Description
Initiating 13.1 Identify Stakeholders Identifying project stakeholders, that is, people impacted by the project, and documenting their interests, involvement, and impact on the project.

 

Planning 13.2 Plan Stakeholder Management  

Determining the needs of project stakeholders and defining methods of satisfying those needs.

 

Executing 13.3 Manage Stakeholder Engagement

 

 

Build and maintain stakeholder engagement throughout project to maximize buy-in and minimize conflict.
Monitoring & Controlling 13.4 Control Stakeholders Engagement Manage any changes that are requested by stakeholders.

Note how the new process 13.3 Manage Stakeholder Engagement in the 5th Edition used to be the old process 10.4 Manage Stakeholder Expectations in the 4th Edition, with the word “Expectations” being changed now to “Engagement.” It’s just a change of one word, but understanding what is behind this change is the key to understanding the higher priority PMI now gives to Stakeholder Management.

2. Stakeholder Engagement—Wider than Communications

When you have a large number of stakeholders, you analyze them at the Initiating stage to see what level of power and interest they have with relationship to the project.

Here’s a grid, based on the horizontal axis of low interest on the left and high interest on the right, and the vertical axis of low interest on the bottom and high interest on the top. Each sector of stakeholder requires a different strategy. Each level of engagement, from Monitor, to Inform, to Satisfy, to Manage engages the group of stakeholders at a level of increasing intensity, and this intensity is reflected visually in the darkness of the shade of red in the diagram.

But it also shows that the old shoehorning of Stakeholder Management under Communications really only dealt with one quadrant of the Stakeholder Engagement process. And it is that more dimensional view of stakeholder engagement that PMI wanted to promote by making Stakeholder Management its own knowledge area.

The next post will deal with the 5 new processes that comprise the now 47 process groups in the 5th Edition of the PMBOK® Guide.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: